Princeton Area Alumni Association

Social Activities

This committee strives to organize and host events that appeal to a wide range of Princeton alumni. (More)
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PAAA

Private Tour of "Capping Liberty" Numismatic exhibit at Firestone Library.

PA3 members are invited to a private curatorial tour of the upcoming exhibit at Firestone Library, on Wednesday 4 April 2012, from 5:30 to 7:00 PM at the Milberg Gallery in Firestone Library.  Tour begins at 6; wine will be served.  Cost:  Free to PA3 members. 
RSVP to PrincetonAreaAlumni@gmail.com to reserve a spot.

Capping Liberty:
The Invention of a Numismatic Iconography for the New American Republic

An Exhibition of Coins, Medals, Banknotes, and Related Books, Manuscripts,
and Graphic Arts from Princeton University Collections
Milberg Gallery, Firestone Library, March 3, 2012, to July 8, 2012


The exhibit highlights the Library's rich collection of Revolutionary-War coinage including the first coin issued under the US Constitution, the 1792 half-disme (sic; they used the French spelling).
Other important coins from the Princeton University Numismatic Collection in
the exhibition are four issues of the seventeenth-century Massachusetts silver shilling
coinage, two examples of the tin "Continental dollar" patterns of 1776, and a 1794 (14
star) silver dollar.

The "poster piece" of the exhibition is the gilt bronze striking of Augustin Dupré's
1783 Libertas Americana medal, a gift of Rodman Wanamaker, Class of 1886, which is
believed it have been the basis for the depiction of Liberty on the early United States
coinage. It is accompanied by a selection of ancient coins that inspired it, including a
Sicilian dekadrachm and a series of denarii of the Roman Republic and sestertii of the
Empire that show the goddess Libertas and her distinctive cap. Other important medals in
the exhibition are an original bronze striking of Dupré's Diplomatic Medal of 1791 (one
of only three known), a gift of the scholar of ancient and American coinage Cornelius
Vermeule III, and a hand-engraved medal believed to have been given to Henry “Light-
Horse Harry” Lee (Princeton Class of 1773). Also on display are three unique plaster
moulds made by Jean-Baptiste Nini as preparatory models for his famous terra-cotta
medallions of Benjamin Franklin.

Complementing the coins and medals from the Numismatic Collection are many
items from other divisions of Princeton’s Special Collection, including books formerly in
the libraries of Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson. Among
the depictions of Liberty from colonial publications is the portrait of John Hancock
engraved in 1774 by Paul Revere, where the patriot is flanked by a knight with a copy of
the Magna Charta and Liberty with her cap. In manuscript letters George Washington
voices support for Jefferson's "Propositions Respecting the Coinage of Gold, Silver and
Copper," and John Adams asks Mint Director Benjamin Rush (Princeton Class of 1760)
for examples of United States coinage for his son John Quincy Adams to send to Russia.
A 1778 print attributed to the painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard depicts Benjamin Franklin
crowned by the goddess Liberty, and a large piece of Toile de Jouy fabric printed around
1785 has the image of George Washington in a gold chariot drawn by cheetahs.
When the founders of the American Republic declared independence from Great
Britain on July 4, 1776, one of the major tasks they took on was the creation of a coinage
for the new nation. There were few precedents to guide them in choosing specific images
to represent the ideals of their republican form of government as most existing coinage
bore the image of a monarch. The leading figures in the process of selecting the
numismatic imagery of the American Republic were Benjamin Franklin, Thomas
Jefferson, and George Washington, each of whom made contributions that reflected
personal background, attitudes, and ideals. Following a rancorous dispute between the
Senate and the House of Representatives, the ultimate choice for the main image for the
new coinage was "an impression emblematic of Liberty," which took the form of the head
of a beautiful woman, sometimes accompanied by a cap derived from classical attributes
of the Roman goddess Libertas. Together with the complementary attributes of an eagle
and a wreath, this symbol came to exemplify the United States of America.
The rich resources of Princeton University Library’s Department of Rare Books
and Special Collections serve as the basis of an exhibition entitled "Capping Liberty,"
which illustrates the search for imagery and the selection and adoption of symbols for a
national coinage.
"The star of the show will undoubtedly be the Princeton specimen of the 1792
'half disme'," predicts Alan Stahl, the exhibition's curator. This is a superb example of the
first coin minted by the United States government under the Constitution. Delays in
passing the Mint Act of 1792 left little time to strike coins that year, so a very small issue
of half dismes (the old French spelling was used on the piece) was minted in a temporary
facility, reputedly from silver supplied by George Washington for the purpose. Fewer
than 2,000 examples are believed to have been struck. The Princeton specimen was
purchased by Charles A. Cass, Class of 1904, from an auction in 1917, by Thomas Elder
where it was described as "the finest known specimen of this exceedingly rare coin." It
came to Princeton with the impressive Cass numismatic collection by bequest in 1958.
The specimen has been characterized by Roger Siboni, president of the American
Numismatic Society, as "perhaps the finest, or one of the finest 1792 half dismes in
existence" in an article in Coin World (Sept. 1, 2008).
Other important coins from the Princeton University Numismatic Collection in
the exhibition are four issues of the seventeenth-century Massachusetts silver shilling
coinage, two examples of the tin "Continental dollar" patterns of 1776, and a 1794 (14
star) silver dollar.
The "poster piece" of the exhibition is the gilt bronze striking of Augustin Dupré's
1783 Libertas Americana medal, a gift of Rodman Wanamaker, Class of 1886, which is
believed it have been the basis for the depiction of Liberty on the early United States
coinage. It is accompanied by a selection of ancient coins that inspired it, including a
Sicilian dekadrachm and a series of denarii of the Roman Republic and sestertii of the
Empire that show the goddess Libertas and her distinctive cap. Other important medals in
the exhibition are an original bronze striking of Dupré's Diplomatic Medal of 1791 (one
of only three known), a gift of the scholar of ancient and American coinage Cornelius
Vermeule III, and a hand-engraved medal believed to have been given to Henry “Light-
Horse Harry” Lee (Princeton Class of 1773). Also on display are three unique plaster
moulds made by Jean-Baptiste Nini as preparatory models for his famous terra-cotta
medallions of Benjamin Franklin.
Complementing the coins and medals from the Numismatic Collection are many
items from other divisions of Princeton’s Special Collection, including books formerly in
the libraries of Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson. Among
the depictions of Liberty from colonial publications is the portrait of John Hancock
engraved in 1774 by Paul Revere, where the patriot is flanked by a knight with a copy of
the Magna Charta and Liberty with her cap. In manuscript letters George Washington
voices support for Jefferson's "Propositions Respecting the Coinage of Gold, Silver and
Copper," and John Adams asks Mint Director Benjamin Rush (Princeton Class of 1760)
for examples of United States coinage for his son John Quincy Adams to send to Russia.
A 1778 print attributed to the painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard depicts Benjamin Franklin
crowned by the goddess Liberty, and a large piece of Toile de Jouy fabric printed around
1785 has the image of George Washington in a gold chariot drawn by cheetahs.

Cap-lib
Related Events

Private tour of Capping Liberty: The Invention of a Numismatic Iconography for the New American Republic Exhibit ( Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM )

A private tour by Firestone Library's Curator of Numismatics, Alan Stahl, for PA3 members.

Exhibit will be open from 5:30 to 7 pm on Wednesday 4 April 2012.
Curatorial tour begins at 6.
Wine will be served.
R.S.V.P. to PrincetonAreaAlumni@gmail.com


Location: Milberg Gallery; Firestone Library
Cost: No charge to PA3 members
Organized by: PA3 and Firestone Library

Posted by vsevolod over 6 years ago.

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PU Chapel Choir Concert

Milbank Memorial Concert
Saturday, April 21, 8 p.m.

Celebrating 20 Years of Chapel Music With Penna Rose
All-Night Vigil, Op. 37 by Sergei Rachmaninoff
and music of
 Chesnokov, Hogan, Tippett, Whitacre and Wilberg
Chapel Choir • Penna Rose, conductor
 
Admission free

The members of the chapel choir especially wanted to invite nearby alumni to their spring concert on April 21st in the Princeton chapel at 8:00 pm. This is a particularly special concert because they are celebrating our director, Penna Rose, and the twenty years that she has been directing the choir. Visit their website for more information: http://www.princetonchapelchoir.com/
Related Events

PU Chapel Choir Concert ( Saturday, April 21, 2012 - 8:00 PM to 10:00 PM )

Area alumni are invited to this free concert by the University Chapel Choir.

Location: PU Chapel
Cost: Free
Organized by: PU Chapel Choir

Posted by Princeton AAA over 6 years ago.

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Climate Change Seminar

William Happer, Cyrus Fogg Brackett Professor of Physics at Princeton, will conduct a seminar on climate change for PA3 members on Tuesday, February 28 at 7:30 p.m. in 111 East Pyne. Will is extremely well informed on this topic and is a well known skeptic of the "current scientific consensus." He was one of 16 signatories on a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed titled "No Need to Panic about Global Warming."

The event is free but limited to the first 20 to RSVP. E-mail tswift@alumni.princeton.edu to register or for more information.

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Climate Change Seminar ( Tuesday, February 28, 2012 - 7:30 PM to 10:00 PM )
Location: 111 East Pyne
Cost: free

Posted by Sara over 6 years ago.

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First Friday Lunch - March 2, 2012

Join us for First Fridays, a monthly recurring event for undergraduate and graduate Princeton alumni, graduate students, and parents.  On the first Friday of each month, area alumni and their guests will meet to enjoy a prix fixe luncheon buffet at the Nassau Club in downtown Princeton.  As a special bonus for PA3, a Princeton PhD candidate will present his/her work to the group in this informal setting.  Topics vary monthly and are always interesting!

This month, we will be joined by Ph.D Candidate Sarah Fawcett, of the Department of Geosciences. Sarah will talk with us about the ocean's "biological pump", the storage of atmospheric CO2 fixed as biomass in the deep ocean and the extent to which different phytoplankton drive this process.

Specially priced at $25/person (or $30 if you choose not to pay PA3's annual dues), lunch includes the Nassau Club’s full buffet as well as a complementary beverage (wine, beer, soft drink). Pre-registration is required. 

>> Looking forward to seeing you...in your orange and black! <<

Date: Friday, March 2nd, 2012
Time: 12 noon - 2 pm
Location: Nassau Club, 6 Mercer St, Princeton, NJ
Nassau Club membership is not necessary to attend this event.
For more information, contact Lydia Zaininger '83 .

Lunch Reservation
Nassauclubphoto Sarahfawcett
Related Events

First Friday Lunch ( Friday, March 2, 2012 - 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM )
Location: Nassau Club, 6 Mercer St, Princeton NJ
Cost: $25 for dues payers ($30 for others)
Organized by: PA3

Posted by lydia over 6 years ago.

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Reception & Dinner with Prof. Jonathan Cohen/Neuroscience



A Joint PA3/Graduate School Event

featuring

Professor Jonathan Cohen (Psychology)
Founding Director of the Neuroscience Institute
at Princeton University


Tuesday, March 6th, 2012
Cocktail Reception and Talk at 5:30PM
Dinner at 6:30PM

    

~~~~~~~~~~

Join graduate and undergraduate alumni for this unique opportunity to meet with
Prof. Cohen at a cocktail reception at Wyman House (Dean Russel's residence),
followed by dinner at the High Table in Procter Hall, Graduate College.

Read about the High Table at 
 http://www.princeton.edu/~gradcol/perm/hightable.htm)

~~~~~~~~~~

All PA3 members (graduate and undergraduate alumni) are invited.  

Courtesy of the Graduate School's Office for Alumni Relations, the event is FREE!

PA3 expresses its sincere gratitude to the Graduate School Office for Alumni Relations for arranging and hosting us for this truly special event. 
We also thank Dean Russel for opening his home to us again to enjoy this memorable evening.

~~~~~~~~~~


RSVP to Cathy Haught *05 chaught@alumni.princeton.edu.
Spaces are limited, so please respond early.

 


Wyman Ctr1_sm Ph3_sm
Related Events

PA3/Grad School 'High Table' ( Tuesday, March 6, 2012 - 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM )
Location: Graduate College
Cost: Free, courtesy of the Graduate School's Office for Alumni Relations
Organized by: PA3/Graduate School

Posted by lydia over 6 years ago.

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